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Amazon Best Sellers Rank:

NP 61 Star ReviewsOne of the best biographies written by a musician!
A Riveting, Mythic, Rock and Roll Memoir
Wonderful! Excellent Read!
Thoroughly Entertaining.
A Great Read
A Window Into a Fascinating Era
Rock and Roll, baby!
A Must Read
A Great Read About An Exciting Life
Music Has Found Me Again
SO Worth Reading!
My Life Seemed Extremely Boring After Finishing “Night People”
Lessons of Life, Love, and Sex in the 60s
Genuine, Exciting, Graphic and Memorable – life in the 60’s
Fantastic Coming of Age Memoir!
Great Look At An Era
Meant to be savored
Rock and roll band life
Brilliantly crafted
Passion for music
Car Thieves take me away!

Complete Guide to the 2016 Candidates’ Favorite Music | Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone reached out to all the major candidates, conducting new interviews, examining rally playlists and digging deep into their musical history to find out. Some of what we discovered was predictable (Ted Cruz claims he “didn’t like how rock music responded” to the 9/11 attacks and turned to country), and some of it was surprising (Mike Huckabee will talk your ear off about Grand Funk Railroad).

From Hillary Clinton and Selena Gomez to Marco Rubio and N.W.A, here are the candidates’ favorite musicians

Source: Complete Guide to the 2016 Candidates’ Favorite Music | Rolling Stone

Keith Richards: Beatles’ Sgt Pepper was rubbish

Here in the United States in the middle sixties, there was always a friendly competition between East Coast and West Coast bands, personified by the Beach Boys and the Four Seasons. And though there became a creative competition between the Beatles and the Beach Boys, the long and winding visceral rivalry for the Beatles has always been the Rolling Stones. Especially as they put their own opposing brands onto rock and roll stardom as they entered the Seventies. You always had to choose if you were a Beatles fan or a Stones fan. Though I didn’t care for the Beatles originally, as I mentioned in Night People, I did come to appreciate them, and to be astonished, let alone highly influenced, by “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” as you’ll read about it in Enchanted, should you chose to read it.  - Rolling Stones' Keith Richards Slams The Beatles' Sergeant Pepper Album - 'A Mishmash Of Rubbish'

Beatles Cosplay for Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, genius album

I didn’t care much for the Stones when I first heard them either, and even now I only grudgingly appreciate some of their classic songs like “Symphony for the Devil” and “Gimme Shelter.” Especially since I had to sing several Stones songs, all of them non-melodic, like “Get Off Of My Cloud” and “Satisfaction.” However Keith Richards has now officially hit my idiot list with his criticism of the Sergeant Pepper album. In a recent interview for Esquire Magazine, without provocation Keith volunteered:

Keith Richards from Esquire Magazine article:

Keith Richards, open mouth, insert guitar – Esquire Magazine 6/30

“The Beatles sounded great when they were the Beatles. But there’s not a lot of roots in that music. I think they got carried away. Why not? If you’re the Beatles in the ’60s, you just get carried away—you forget what it is you wanted to do. You’re starting to do Sgt. Pepper. Some people think it’s a genius album, but I think it’s a mishmash of rubbish, kind of like Satanic Majesties—”Oh, if you can make a load of shit, so can we.”

What? Are you kidding me? Read more about weird Keith in this Huntington Post UK article.

Night People review – Readers’ Favorite

This is a review of NIGHT PEOPLE, Book 1 – Things We Lost in the Night, A Memoir of Love and Music in the 60s with Stark Naked and the Car Thieves from Readers’ Review. Thank you, Mamta!

Reviewed By Mamta Madhavan for Readers’ Favorite

Things We Lost in the Night: A Memoir of Love and Music in the 60s with Stark Naked and the Car Thieves by Larry J. Dunlap is an honest memoir in which the author has carefully depicted his years as a young and struggling musician, along with his friends as they strive for fame and fortune. The book also captures the essence of the 1960s when there was a cultural and musical shift. Their transformation from a small band to that of a famous one and their successes change Larry’s perspective on a lot of things in life. In a nutshell, the memoir exposes the 1960s, the music industry, vocal groups, R&B cover bands, Las Vegas, San Francisco, Hollywood recording studios, the nightlife, and the sexual revolution that happened during that period.

The memoir connects with readers intimately as the author shares every small detail of his life. Readers are taken into the author’s world of music, the problems they face as a band, and their struggle for survival initially. The rise of the band opens the way for many other things, and the author also speaks about the sacrifices they make on their way to the top. Many moments in the author’s life are poignantly mingled with misery, happiness, music and sex. I found the book interesting as it speaks about music, the band, recordings and many other things related with music. The challenges the author faces in his life and his love life and other casualties make this memoir a very exciting read.


Book Cover for NIGHT PEOPLE, Book 1 - Things We Lost in the Night, A Memoir of Love and Music in the 60s with Stark Naked and the Car Thieves


Book 1 – Things We Lost in the Night,
A Memoir of Love and Music in the 60s
with Stark Naked and the Car Thieves

ON SALE NOW for the next week – July 16 thru July 23 for $.299!



Author Interview with Sophia Tallon

First of all, tell us a little about yourself!

B&W-PROFILE-PIC-lo-resI’ve lived my life in several improbable incarnations. My memoir, Things We Lost in the Night, A Memoir of Love and Music in the 60s with Stark Naked and the Car Thieves tells about my years in music as a singer/musician/performer, and a bit about where I was raised in Indianapolis, Indiana. After those six years contained in two books, NIGHT PEOPLE, which is being released on June 15, and ENCHANTED, due out early in 2016, I roamed Hollywood as a personal manager, record producer, and Sunset Boulevard recording studio owner. During my Hollywood years I also wrote a music magazine column for a Southern California Lifestyle magazine, and authored and drew a published music-based cartoon strip named Frets.

In the early Eighties, determined to find my way out of the music business, I conceived a crazy idea centered around my love for games, computers, a technology I was just discovering, and a suggestion from a friend involved in the rapid growth of cable television. Once written up as a proposal, the concept of led me on an amazing journey of developing the first digital broadcasting network on cable television. Though that company, The Games Network went public and was very nearly successful, it was a bit ahead of its time. However, in the process I’d gotten my ‘street’ MBA and ‘on-the-job’ technical degrees in networking and software development. Though I spent a few years in independent video and film production, I returned to technical endeavors as a consultant, earning my professional writing bones as a pencil-for-hire technical and training writer for Fortune 50 companies. Over the years, I’d taken some of the game concepts from my cable television experience to design my own only strategy, multi-player game and learned enough to begin developing it, and while a critical success, I was unable to turn it into a commercial one and returned to technical consulting until I was able to turn my attention to full time creative writing. I married a girl I originally met when she was in a software training class I taught and we now live in Southern California quietly marinating in the sun. She is my muse.

What inspired you to become an author?

Many things, but first and foremost, reading. No matter what else I was doing in life from the earliest age that I could hold a book, I was always reading. I make a distinction between being a writer and being an author. I found I could accomplish a lot writing, and it was what helped me in my role as CEO of a cable television company, and then full-time, when I turned to technical writing as a consultant. Designing my own game, Imperial Wars, required tons of technical writing. I did make two or three real attempts to become an author, one of them while I was still playing the band that’s featured in Things We Lost in the Night. But I recognized early on that while I learned a lot about organizing material I was going to write, and the reality of deadlines that were very useful, there is an entirely different skill set necessary to write creative fiction; to become an author. I always believed there would come a time when I could throw my full attention into it and learn those skills. I hadn’t really realized how much time it was actually going to take me until I took on this project.

What author influenced you the most?

In a general sense, far too many to mention. In the specific sense of my current book, there were ones who helped me understand memoir as a genre. It’s a form of creative non-fiction, bounded by the author’s memory. While it is based in truth, it is the author’s truth. I learned that I would need to use the tools of a novelist to reflect the memories that I’d shared with my band brothers, and to bring out the compelling story throughline as I experienced it, so it would be intelligible to readers. At first, I didn’t even know I was writing memoir at all. I thought I was just telling about the amazing adventures of a band in a crucial time of social change our country’s history. But I came to understand that no matter how interesting I thought our adventures were, there were probably few readers who would understand unless they could see the story through my eyes.  I needed models for how to do that. I believe that three authors showed me the way for different reasons, so I hope I can be pardoned for picking more than one.
1. Cheryl Strayed – Wild. While I was discovering what memoir, as a genre, was about, I looked for other books in this field. Personally, I hadn’t read a lot of memoirs, and those I had I didn’t really care for. This author brought frank personal honesty to her writing, informing me of how I would have to reveal myself if I wanted my readers to feel how the events I experienced affected and changed me. She also demonstrated how powerful narration and exposition can be in memoir.
2. Kaui Hart Hemmings – The Descendants. Most people probably remember the movie starring George Clooney, but it was an amazing and wonderful book first. And, it’s fiction. However, after reading a lot of memoir, I realized that fiction, written as memoir, is a great teacher as well. This writer’s sharp insightful looks at human interaction, makes me catch my breath. Her description of a man caught in a web of emotions while his wife is in a life-threatening coma, finding that she’s been unfaithful, dealing with his per-adolescent and teenage daughters with their own emotional responses, and his ongoing important professional responsibilities would have just been sad in the hands of a less skilled writer. Instead, she finds the lightness and humor, and life-in-death of this story. As a part of my book deals with its own crisis and personal loss, I hope to somehow emulate her magical touch. But it’s probably a bar beyond my reach.
3. Kiana Davenport – The House of Many Gods. The crisis I mention above revolves around Hawaii. I don’t want to get into the story itself, but there were crucial things that happened that I couldn’t understand when I began both books of this memoir, even after more than 45 years. Kiana gave me insight into the Hawaiian spirit, its strengths and weaknesses. Beyond that specifically, her authorial heart is worn on her sleeve as she writes. I can only describe her writing as ferocious and compelling. While I love Kaui’s light touch, I don’t want to lose sight of, or fear expressing, strong emotions.

Do you have a favourite author? (Or name a few)

I would like to consider the three authors mentioned above as joining my favorite authors even though I’ve discovered them in the course of my own work, and I would add Mary Karr, who wrote Liar’s Club to the list. However, I have authors dating back to my science-fiction years who I’ve always loved and influenced me in earlier projects, including Isaac Asimov and his Foundation Trilogy, James Blish’s Cities in Flight novels, Alfred Bester, the author of my favorite science fiction book, The Stars My Destination, Gregory Benford and the Galactic Center novels, and Neal Stephenson’s Snow Crash. Although, in mystery, I love to read Michael Connelly and Robert Crais, I love Dennis Lehane’s early novels and feel the impact of his style the most.

What is the best writing advice you have ever received?

Organize. Know where you’re going. And write every day without fail. My current project is very large, since it actually contains both books, written as one large story. But I’ve tried to follow the standard that there needs to be every word necessary to tell the story, and not a word more—or less. I probably don’t meet that standard exactly, but I aspire to it, and I’ve never had a reader tell me that NIGHT PEOPLE, this first book, feels too long. Taking on a project of this magnitude, I felt I needed to thoroughly understand my story arc. There are certain threads and themes that work their way through the entire six years. To do this, I built calendars, and a long chart of months covering the years of Things We Lost in the Night. Then I overlaid it with the documented events I’d spent months collecting, to use as milestones. When I could see where they landed, I added my remembrances, running as much of them as I could past my band mates, and friends who’d experienced parts of it. I connected the dots through the main characters and their story arcs. By making choices about what would be in the book, since not everything can, I was able to pull out certain points and flesh them out to reveal how our story moved and its emotional impacts. It was amazing how much I was learning about myself and my friends from this view. Deconstructing from there, came chapters, scenes, and what needed to be in them. Once I had sections, and chapters, I could approach the work in reasonable chunks of writing. I can’t say I came to this approach all at once but I experimented until I found this path. I was guided by many years of technical writing where research and planning were necessary to deliver a cogent document.

What helps you write when you’re stuck or have writer’s block?

Another value of coming from a background of professional writing is that there is no such excuse as writer’s block. You can’t tell a client you can’t finish his specification or training curriculum because you had writer’s block. So I haven’t experienced it very much. In those moments where I’m not sure exactly what to do, I refer back to my diagrams and reexamine what’s going on, look for the connections between events and the characters and find the character motivations, or connecting events I’d forgotten or missed. We’re human beings, there is an emotional logic that goes into how we move through life. I’ve found this always works since I know the story. What I don’t understand are writers who tell me they let their characters take over their story, and how that causes writer’s block when they try to figure out what comes next. I think an author’s job regarding characters is similar to that of a movie director—you can give them their head a bit, as long as they stick to the story line. That doesn’t mean your characters can’t grow or develop, but it’s your job as the author/director to make sure the overall story gets told.
Memoir has prepared me to write long form, because I believe I would immerse myself in a fictional story I wanted to write, to the point that I would feel as though it had actually happened in my author persona. The main difference is, in memoir, since you’re dealing with a whole memory over years, you have to find what must be removed to reveal the story, where in fiction it takes accretion to build a story. But once you know it, if you’re blocked, it’s because there’s something mechanical going wrong in the story that you need to find by backing up to check out your big picture.

What are you working on currently?

ENCHANTED, the concluding book of the memoir. Fortunately, I wrote Things We Lost in the Night as a single story. I decided I was going to have to divide it into two books at a natural point in the storyline. It turned out to be exactly halfway in terms of time, and amazingly enough, a change in tone as well. While the first book is about the band struggling to survive and grow, and me trying to figure out my personal life, in the second book the band has achieved a comfortably high level of success, though not producing the hit records we want so desperately to achieve. I’ve finally discovered personal happiness and dare to tweak the ears of fate in attempts to find a way to overcome the band’s greatest hurdle. The crisis in the band comes from struggling with our inability to reach that final rung to national prominence, and more importantly from the security we’ve achieved. Our differences are separating us, rather than binding us together as they did when were traveling. The feeling that everything is perfect in my personal life turns in an instant to a quagmire of despair and a hurricane of emotions that threatens my sanity. Can I save either my band, or my family, or both—or neither.

When you’re not writing, what do you like to do?

It’s so embarrassing. When I’m not reading, I love to read, and I like to go to movies on weekday mornings, when no one’s around. I’m at my computer every single day. It’s such a habit to write that I cannot face a day without it. Thank goodness my wife gets me out of the house for walks with our Chili Dog and to broadening events of various kinds. We live in a college town and there always presentations of some kind available. Sometimes we get into Los Angeles for various musical events, too.

What are some of your most favourite books of all time?

I’ve probably mentioned them above, but for science fiction, it’s easy. The Stars My Destination. It should be a movie. Every once in a while I think I’d like to do a movie treatment for it. I’ve seen it’s been optioned but never made. Can’t understand it. I also mentioned Snow Crash, a phenomenal book about an internet we still may see with the advent of virtual reality bringing the digital world closer and closer to interacting with the real world. It’s something I’m very interested in; my online game had a similar concept of part of the game being played in a game space while another part played in the wider meta-game of the real world.
For inspiration, I can always look to Richard Bach’s Illusions of A Reluctant Messiah, and Steven Pressfield’s Do The Work.
I love Dennis Lehane’s A Drink Before the War, and his other earliest books. I am in awe of Kiana Davenport’s The House of Many Gods, and Kaui Hart Hemmings, The Descendants.

Is there anything specific you’d like to try writing about in the future?

I can hardly wait to finish the memoir. I had some choices when I chose it to write, and I’m more than ready to pick one those, or something entirely new. I had no idea this book would take five years and counting.
During the years I spent developing Imperial Wars, my graphical online multiplayer strategy game, I developed a backstory of a galactic empire on the brink of destruction. I’ve already divided into a trilogy, and written a few chapters when I took a forced break after the memoir’s first draft.
I have been developing a present-day character, that I’d like to write about. He is essentially an outlaw, dishonorably discharged from the army where he was a Ranger. He stands accused of a brutal act that he can barely remember in Afghanistan and struggles with bouts of mental illness. He takes odd jobs as an off-the-grid, off-the-book private investigator and squats in a rundown boat in a down-at-the-heels marina, in Long Beach, California. I have an interesting idea for a first case that I’ve been discussing with a friend of mine that deals with retribution, the death penalty, the murder of an elderly woman by a child, and a conspiracy.
Someone close to me has suggested a series of fictional, based loosely on fact, sequel to this memoir. It makes me wonder …

Which of your characters do you love the most and why?

With the understanding that characters in a memoir are real people, they are still characters; it’s impossible to capture a whole human being in a billion words. So, as I’m always willing to admit, as soon as I put someone down on paper they cease being flesh and blood but are reduced to a few lines of description, dialog, and action. With that said, I had to most fun writing about certain individuals we met, like our informal ‘pharmacist’ introduced in The Pharmacist and the Nurse chapter. The attorney who managed to snatch me from induction into the army is a wonderful character in The Prophet and the Lawyer chapter, along with the standup comic-in-waiting, moonlighting as a bartender. A girl I only knew as Kathy is a big favorite in Two Bricks and a Hundred Dollar Bill. Don’t want to leave out Eddie Pru, a mobster/entertainer who trained us in stagecraft, and his amazing girlfriend Torchie, in Torchie and the Pru, or Larry Lamb, the youngest brother of the Sheriff of Clark County, Las Vegas who allegedly filled Caesars Palace’s fountains with soap powder, who you’ll meet in Bonnie Springs Ranch. I love them all for their quirkiness.

Which one of your books are you most proud of?

NIGHT PEOPLE, since it’s my first full book. I’m proud of it because I feel as though I’ve captured the essence of each of the main characters, and the band’s experience. I’m happy that the themes have come through without being overly obvious, but there if you look for them, and that there is a complexity of real life about the books without the confusion of real life. I think there is a deceptive depth of layers to the story that allows re-reading. I know that most readers won’t notice the symbolism or threads but I believe subliminally, these things bring a feeling of depth to a book. On the other hand, I cannot look at this book without wanting to re-write parts of it—just one more time please!

What is an interesting or hidden talent you have?

Patterns, though I’m not sure it’s a talent, it’s at least an attribute. I tend to see the world in a series of patterns, tendencies, possibilities, rather than static in time.

Is there anything else you’d like my readers to know?

That I believe we are all a story, and that I’m immortal in the sense of relative time, and that I believe everyone else is too. Our stories coincide if we experience our relative times in a way that intersect with one another, but we always live in our own bubble of existence. We come into this world alone, live in it that way no matter how close we grow to others, and we leave it the same way. And that the universe is far, far, far more complex than we can ever know or give it credit for, and that we are way bigger than our stories in the here and now.

Where can we find you on social media?

You can find my book at Amazon at:
My author website, including my blog, is:
My author Facebook page is
My Amazon author page is:
My Goodreads author page is:
My twitter account is: @LarryJDunlap
My Instagram account is: www.instagram/larryinla
My Pinterest account is:

(Posted from Sophia’s blog @

The Girl Who Named 3 Dog Night – June Fairchild

June Fairchild (Wilson) 1971

Larry J Dunlap –

I never met June Fairchild, though I first heard about her in 1968, and even then I didn’t know her name. Her given name was June Wilson and she was born in Manhattan Beach, California. Like many of the young beautiful girls of the 60s, she wanted to be a movie star. During the years she was with Danny Hutton of “Roses and Rainbows” fame , she took the fateful step of joining the Screen Actors Guild, discovering that someone had already taken that name. Danny, apparently suggested Fairchild for her stagename and that was accepted. June is famous for naming as well. When she read in a National Geographic that Australian Aborigines defined how cold nights were in the Outback by how many dogs you needed to sleep with to keep warm enough to survive she told Danny that’s what he should name his new band. If it was really cold, it was a three-dog night. It stuck and Three Dog Night when on to a memorable career.

It appeared that June would go on to a memorable career too, as she worked in several movies and danced on Hollywood A’ Go Go TV show with a troupe called the Gazzari Dancers,  though they have no official connection to the Gazzari’s night club where we and many, many other 60s band played. Somehow, in someway, in a haze of drugs and alcohol, she fell through the cracks. The Manhattan Beach prom queen, famous go-go dancer, actress with a brilliant life and future fell all the way down to a skid row cardboard box in downtown Los Angeles. The mean, mean streets of rape and beatings.

Floyd Sneed, pictured here with June last September, was who told several of the guys in our band that some people had come in to see us, as we sat around a table at the

Floyd Sneed with June Fairchild

Floyd Sneed with June Fairchild

Rag Doll night club in North Hollywood in 1968. But they’d missed us, it was our night off. Floyd had been playing our off-nights with an excellent little trio called “Heat Wave,” and we’d become friendly. Especially with our drummer Leonard. One night Leonard asked Floyd, who held his sticks like hammers, about his unusual style and Floyd said, “African Lighting, baby, African Lightning.” He explained that even when the people who came to see us discovered we weren’t playing that night, they stayed anyway and then asked him if he’d like to audition for this new super group they were forming. “Three lead singers,” he’d said. “I told you guys I wanted to play in a group like yours, and look what happened?” I can’t remember for certain but I’m pretty certain it was Reb Foster, one of Three Dog’s managers, and Danny Hutton.

When one of us asked what the name of this hot new super group was, he said Three Dog Night, Leonard, puzzled, wanted to know what that meant. Floyd shrugged. “I dunno. Danny’s girlfriend read something about how many dogs you gotta sleep with on a really cold night, but,” Floyd grinned, and leaned back in his chair. “How can guys in a band called Stark Naked and the Car Thieves question anyone else’s wacky name?”

June died of liver cancer last Tuesday, at the age of 68 in a convalescent home. Two of her high school girlfriends rescued her several years earlier from the streets to get her to come to a reunion. Though life was difficult her living on social security disability she remained living in small downtown hotels doing her best. It may not be the newest story of the high-flying 60s, of the time and place, but it reminds me of the pitfalls and dangers my friends and I saw take down so many. There’s a donation site for June at I’m going to go donate to it in our group’s name. For June, and for many others who burned so bright and fell so far in those days of music and love.

“Pleasure” Atlantic City 1967
The Pleasure Of Your Company/Maria, Love and Music“I remember my mother watching your show when I was a child. Those songs are still in my head as an adult. I would like to know who sings “I’d Like to Have the Pleasure of Your Company” and what year was it released? Thank you — Veronica, via Facebook

“The group was called S.N. and the CT’s (Stark Naked and the Car Thieves). Basically it was a studio group that put it together on a little independent label called Sunburst. Didn’t do anything much nationally, but locally a great hit and can be found on the Geator’s For Dancers Only CD, volume 2. Great cha-cha record. The year was 1968.”



A Lost Recording from 50 Years Ago!

The Reflections / Illusions '63 & '64

The Reflections / Illusions ’63 & ’64

For those of you who’ve been following along, Stark Naked and the Car Thieves began as an acappella vocal group back in Indianapolis. We called ourselves the Reflections when our very first recording was released in late 1963 on WLS radio in Chicago. Unexpectedly, our uptempo version of In The Still of the Night hit the Chicago charts in early 1964 at the same time the Beatles did with I Want to Hold Your Hand. If you can read the chart below you’ll see we arrived at #17 while the Beatles languished at #40. Our producer screwed up and lost or accidentally destroyed the master of In The Still of The Night so even though we got great airplay and were about to break out nationally, when the charts came out two weeks later, our record had fallen off into oblivion while the Beatles were on their way to number one.

WLS Chart Jan 17, 1964

WLS Chart Jan 17, 1964

What you don’t know is, and that’s because even I’ve never heard or seen a copy of the record since we recorded it 50 years ago, our producer rushed us into the studio to get another record out to try to take advantage of the tremendous interest in the Reflections up in the Windy City. Since we sounded a lot like the Four Seasons, he found a song by Larry Huff, who’d co-written Easier Said Than Done for the Essex, called In the Beginning. We tried to adapt to sound like it was from the original Jersey Boys right in the studio, recording literally overnight. By the time it was pressed, the Reflections who recorded (Just Like) Romeo and Juliet) had hit with their song, and our name and all the good will we’d built up with the previous record was lost.  He had to decide on the spot what we would be called so he decided we were the Illusions. But the record failed and soon the Indy Sound no longer existed.

Today, doing some research for Things We Lost in the Night, I ran across our recording on YouTube.  I can’t tell you how amazed and pleased I was. Made me glad I got up this morning. It’s the weirdest thing though, strangers have put almost all our records up on YouTube. I’m hoping the person who posted this knows where I can buy a copy of the original record.


Probably as good a time as any to invite you to the Open House at my new website! I’m halfway through my final draft and scheduled some time to get my site in order. Among other features, is a list of thirteen songs we recorded and that are an important part of Things We Lost in the Night. They’re listed in chronological order (excepting this one of course), and make something of a musical history of the band under its various names. It’s on the THINGS WE LOST page in the Songs from TWL tab here on this site. There’s also a First Chapter sample from the book and two audio excerpts as well as short blurbs from the book. Come one, come all! Look around. Log in , say hi. Let me know what you think.

Thanks – Larry

Across the Musical Universe

Caesars-Palace-1966-300x230IN AUGUST OF 1966, CAESARS PALACE, the most incredible casino/resort/hotel of it’s time, opened its doors to the public. A few months later the most improbable event imaginable happened when Trish Turner, a talented R&B singer who occasionally sang with us in early morning jams introduced me to Clyde Carson, a slight, pasty-faced guy with a mustache so thin it looked painted on ….

“Clyde made me the most inconceivable proposition I’d ever heard. “Would you guys be interested in playing across the street at Caesars Palace?” he said after we’d settled in with our drinks.

He told me he was well connected at Caesars and thought he could get us an audition to open the rumored new Nero’s Nook lounge at the opulent resort hotel. I was incredulous, it had to have been written all over my face. Caesars Palace being just across the street from the Pussycat might be geographically true, but for a band like Stark Naked and the Car Thieves that mammoth edifice was far across the musical universe from us. Only the biggest, most well known stars played there. Andy Williams, who hosted his own prime time television show, opened the main showroom to an international audience of celebrity and wealth flown in from all over the world just a few months ago. No rock star or group, no matter how famous or talented, had ever broken into a major Las Vegas Strip hotel, not even in the lounges. It would happen one day, but it was utter fantasy to imagine that event would take place now, with an unknown group like us. And certainly not at Jay Sarno’s, Jimmy Hoffa financed, luxurious Caesars Palace, already legendary among the elite for glamor and extravagance. When a rock artist did break that barrier, it would be the Beatles or Elvis, or maybe the Four Seasons, somebody famous worldwide taking the stage. Never an unknown band with no hit records, no matter how good anyone might think we were. It was laughable to think how being popular in a local rock n roll dance club would translate to a stage in the immense casino. Caesars overshadowed every other hotel on the Las Vegas strip, even the storied Sands and Flamingo. What Clyde was suggesting was like a talented Little League team being offered an opportunity to play with the Yankees in major league baseball.

And, of course, as is the case in fairy tales, there was a catch. We’d have to kiss a frog — Clyde Carson. He wanted to be our personal manager.” Continue reading…