Larry J. Dunlap Booksigning Event – June 11

cropped-BW-PROFILE-PIC-lo-res.jpgLarry J. Dunlap will be signing books at the Glendora Library Authors and Artists event on June 11 – 11 am to 1 pm. 140 S. Glendora Ave. in Glendora, CA 91741.

FREE eBook with every print edition of “NIGHT PEOPLE, Book 1 of Things We Lost in the Night.”.

Please drop by and pick up a FREE album, “Songs from Things We Lost in the Night,” and say hi.

EVENT WEBSITE

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Free Night People Kindle edition

DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE to get a Free Kindle eBook of Night People!

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WHAT READERS ARE SAYING

Amazon Best Sellers Rank:

NP 61 Star ReviewsOne of the best biographies written by a musician!
A Riveting, Mythic, Rock and Roll Memoir
Wonderful! Excellent Read!
Thoroughly Entertaining.
A Great Read
A Window Into a Fascinating Era
Rock and Roll, baby!
A Must Read
A Great Read About An Exciting Life
Music Has Found Me Again
SO Worth Reading!
My Life Seemed Extremely Boring After Finishing “Night People”
Lessons of Life, Love, and Sex in the 60s
Genuine, Exciting, Graphic and Memorable – life in the 60’s
Fantastic Coming of Age Memoir!
Compelling
Great Look At An Era
Meant to be savored
Engrossing
Rock and roll band life
Brilliantly crafted
Passion for music
Car Thieves take me away!

Paul Krugman: Asimov’s Foundation novels grounded my economics | Books | The Guardian

Detail from one of Alex Wells’s illustrations to the Folio Society edition of The Foundation novels. Illustration: Alex Wells

Isaac Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy was a revelation to me as a young man, and I read it often, especially during moments of stress and anxiety because its scope was a huge, galactic empire over millennia. It was the heaviest influence an online game I designed and I refer to it often in my memoir NIGHT PEOPLE, Book 1 of Things We Lost in the Night. I thought about writing my own post about it but when I ran across Paul Krugman’s article, I decided he’d hit the nail with a much bigger hammer. – Larry J. Dunlap


There are certain novels that can shape a teenage boy’s life. For some, it’s Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged; for others it’s Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. As a widely quoted internet meme says, the unrealistic fantasy world portrayed in one of those books can warp a young man’s character forever; the other book is about orcs. But for me, of course, it was neither. My Book – the one that has stayed with me for four-and-a-half decades – is Isaac Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy, written when Asimov was barely out of his teens himself. I didn’t grow up wanting to be a square-jawed individualist or join a heroic quest; I grew up wanting to be Hari Seldon, using my understanding of the mathematics of human behavior to save civilization. The fantastical tale offers a still-inspiring dream of a social science that could save civilization. –Read more from The Guardian …

 

  • Paul Krugman won the Nobel memorial prize in economic sciences in 2008 and is a columnist for the New York Times

Source: Paul Krugman: Asimov’s Foundation novels grounded my economics | Books | The Guardian

REVIEW – HOUSE OF MANY GODS, KIANA DAVENPORT

House of Many Gods: A NovelHouse of Many Gods: A Novel by Kiana Davenport
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Kiana Davenport’s book House of Many Gods is a wonderful generational novel, beginning in the mid-Sixties and running to present day, along the Waianae coast of Oahu, a neighborhood largely unknown to the outside world. It houses the third-largest homeless population in the United States, made up of mostly ghettoized native Hawaiians. In this novel, set in a house shared by many and various mothers, their children and the occasional father, a story about a young girl takes place. Abandoned by her mother, she struggles within a culture clash within the only home she’s ever known, her expectations, the outside world, and how to love. During the book she finds a way through much of the tragedy and poverty around her to become a doctor, eventually connect the pieces of her life, and travels halfway around the world to rescue a man, also struggling in his native culture, that she’d refused to love. At least as important as the story she tells, Kiana’s descriptions and narrative, as lush and rich as a tropical rainforest, brings along the deep abiding spiritualism of a Hawaiian spirit subjugated by a profusion of foreign influences, from the missionaries to the more recent intrusions of Asian, and most of all, the United States, influences. It’s as if Kaui Hart Hemmings (The Descendants) meets Gregory David Roberts (Shantaram) in Hawai’i. I rank Kiana Davenport alongside my favorite, and most influential authors, Hemmings, Donna Tart, Marisa Pessl, and Dennis Lehane. This will be a read you cannot put down and will never forget.

As a side note, Kiana’s books about Hawai’i, especially this one, have influenced my new book, Enchanted. This review about a year and a half ago, and I feel as strongly about this book now as I did then.

View all my reviews

On the Passing of the Jefferson Airplane

74 seems to be a fatal number. So many greats falling by the wayside at this milepost. Since it’s my number, can’t help but wonder, but I don’t think it’s my time yet. I’ve still got things to say … Read this fascinating article about Paul Kantner and Signe Toly Anderson, Airplane’s first girl vocalist. She was 74, too

It was sad enough that Jefferson Airplane founding member Paul Kantner, the keeper of the famed San Francisco band’s flame throughout its turbulent half-century, died last week, from heart failure. A deeper melancholy set in with news of the death the same day of the Airplane’s first female vocalist, Signe Toly Anderson, from cancer. Both were 74.

Source: On the Passing of the Jefferson Airplane